Monday, September 13, 2021

Review: The Love Hypothesis

The Love Hypothesis

The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood
My rating: 5 of 5 stars 

I've talked on the podcast a few times about the number of books featuring grad students in the sciences, well here is one more and it is a delightful fake relationship trope between a grad student and a professor (but at Stanford he's not her direct advisor so it's fine.) I'm not sure if it was deliberate but I pictured a young Snape as the professor.

And then Erin in Instagram said,

"Apparently this book is re-packaged Rey/Ben Solo fan fiction and the dude is Adam Driver…so Young Snape isn’t too far off IMO"
I had no idea but it does really work now that I know. It didn't feel shoehorned or suffer from the awkwardness of similar attempts in my opinion, so kudos to the author.

And I know this isn't the intent of #scienceseptember but it might be as close as I get this year.

I had a copy from the publisher through NetGalley and it comes out September 14, 2021.


View all my reviews

Review: Several People Are Typing

Several People Are Typing Several People Are Typing by Calvin Kasulke
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book had me chortling in the car in under ten minutes. I don't know what the experience is in print, but the audio - narrated by MacLeod Andrews, Neil Shah, Dani Martineck, Sophie Amoss, Neil Hellegers, Cary Hite, Sean Patrick Hopkins, Joshua Kane, Amy Landon, Nicole Lewis, Brittany Pressley, Jonathan Todd Ross - is like sketch comedy if sketch comedy recited Slack channel conversations from a marketing firm where everyone finds reasons to WFH.

I have only used Slack a few times but that didn't interfere with my understanding of what was happening. Emojis are read as the item but I could :eyes: what they were doing. Different Slack channels are used to help the reader know who is privy to the information. Oh and I just spent 15 minutes reading about :dustystick:

If you had to move to a shared online space because of Covid - Slack, Teams, etc - I think this will be particularly amusing. There are some surprises in there I will leave for the reader.

I received a copy of this from the publisher through the Volumes app. It came out 8/31/21.

View all my reviews

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Review: The Hidden Palace

The Hidden Palace

The Hidden Palace by Helene Wecker
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Golem and the Jinni (2013) was arguably a perfect novel with compelling characters and setting, leaving a lot of readers wanting more. And the author gave us more..is that really what we wanted?

The rest of this post could be spoilers for the first novel.

The golem and the jinni have been friends and more for some time, but their relationship has started to change..the golem has really come in to herself as a career woman while the jinni has struggled to be honest about his dreams and desires. A few other characters factor into the story but the supernatural ones are even more held back by the humanity around them as they head into the first world war.

This came out June 8th, I had a copy from the publisher but of course that date has passed

 
View all my reviews

Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Reading Envy 228: Full of Secrets with Audrey Morris

Audrey Morris, one of the people I chat with most in Instagram about books and baking, joins me to talk books. She also shares about some award lists that have her looking forward to the next few months.

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 228: Full of Secrets

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Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed:

 

Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland
A Spare Life by Lidija Dimkovska, translated by Christina E. Kramer
In the Lateness of the World by Carolyn Forché
The Woman from Uruguay by Pedro Mairal, translated by Jennifer Croft
That Time of Year by Marie Ndiaye, translated by Jordan Stump

Other mentions:

Barkskins by Annie Proulx
Readalong information
The Eighth Life by Nino Haratischvili
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
Wretchedness by Andrzej Tichy
The Yellow House by Sarah M. Broom
Dishoom by Shamil Thakrar
The Employees by Olga Ravn, translated by Martin Aitken
When We Cease to Understand the World by Benjamin Labatut, translated by Adrian Nathan West
In Memory of Memory by Maria Stepanova
Consent by Annabel Lyon
Summer Brother by Jaap Robben
Girl with the Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier
Catch the Rabbit by Lana Bastasic
What You Have Heard is True by Carolyn Forché
Deaf Republic by Ilya Kaminsky
The Missing Year of Juan Salvatierra by Pedro Mairal
Census
by Jesse Ball
The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry
Cutting for Stone by Abraham Varghese
Beyond Babylon by Igiaba Scego
Adua by Igiaba Scego
The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris
Sorrow by Claribel Alegria
Homesick by Jennifer Croft
Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford

Related episodes: 

Episode 088 - Author Head Space with Sara Moore
Episode 112 - Reset Button with Eleanor Thoele
Episode 195 - Muchness with Nadine
Episode 207 - Innocent and Ruthless with Tricia Deegan
Episode 212 - Subtly Fascinating with Vinny

Stalk me online:

Audrey is @dreesreads on Instagram
Audrey at Goodreads
Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy


All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.







Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Books Read August 2021: 189-201

August was very busy with a second child moving in, so this might be my lowest book count yet. But I did get some great Balkans reads in, and some great Women in Translation titles in.

A gentle reminder that all reviews can still be seen on my Goodreads profile (the review will be with the book; the format will be specified unless it's in print.) And the books with green outlines are my 5-star reads for the month!

 

cover images of books listed below

189. Stranger Care by Sarah Sentilles ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
190. How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps her House by Cherie Jones, read by Danielle Vitalis ⭐️⭐️⭐️
191. The Promise by Damon Galgut ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
192. No Ivy League by Hazel Newlevant ⭐️⭐️⭐️
193. Embassy Wife by Katie Crouch ⭐️⭐️⭐️
194. The Age of Skin by Dubravka Ugresic, translated by Ellen Elias-Bursać ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
195. A Spare Life by Lidija Dimkovska, translated by Christina E. Kramer ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
196. This Will All Be Over Soon by Cecily Strong ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
197. The Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-Garcia ⭐️⭐️⭐️
198. The Woman from Uruguay by Pedro Mairal, translated by Jennifer Croft ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
199. Catch the Rabbit by Lana Bastasic, translated by Lana Bastasic ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
200. Homesick by Jennifer Croft ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
201. Landscape Painted with Tea by Milorad Pavic, translated by Christina Pribicevic-Zoric ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Total Books Read:13

Reread: 0

audio: 1
eBook: 7
print: 5

borrowed: 0
library: 3
personal copy:  3
review copy: 5
subscription: 2

Around the World: 8
Booker Prize Longlist: 1
Erin & Dani's Book Club: 0
Europe 2021: 4
Read the World 21 (Balkans): 4
Tournament of Books: 0
Upstate International Book Club: 0
Work book club: 0

Graphic Novel/Comic: 1
Memoir: 2
Music: 0
Nature: 0
Poetry: 0
Translated: 5
Women in Translation: 4, 5 if you count the Croft memoir

Review: Landscape Painted with Tea

Landscape Painted with Tea Landscape Painted with Tea by Milorad Pavić
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This gorgeous edition has been on my shelves since I very first started collecting books for what I called my Around the World challenge in 2012. It's just never stopped. But in my focus on Europe in 2021, I have a shelf of books like this that have been with me an unread for too long.

Set in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, at least in part, the story starts with an architect in search of his father, an officer who vanished in Greece during World War II. This journey takes him to Mount Athos and quickly turns into a lot of italicized portions detailing dreams, stories, myths, fables, etc. I've dropped this book a lot as it drifted me off to sleep.

The second half is based on a crossword with esoteric segments that vary between raunchy and mystical and frankly gave me a huge headache. I can tell this author thinks highly of myself but it took me since January to force my way through it. The conclusion is so ridiculous and annoying, well can you tell what I think of this book.

View all my reviews

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Reading Envy 227 - Strong Words with Ed Needham

Jenny is joined by Ed Needham, who has singlehandedly been producing a literary magazine in the UK. We talk about books we've read recently!

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 227: Strong Words

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed: 

Book covers of books listed below

Mrs. March by Virginia Feito
The Promise by Damon Galgut
Last Summer in the City by Gianfranco Calligarich, translated by Howard Curtis
Stranger Care: A Memoir of Loving What Isn't Ours by Sarah Sentilles
Nina Simone's Gum by Warren Ellis

Other mentions:

Strong Words Magazine
Gossip Girl (tv)
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Discussion of East of Eden on the Literary Disco podcast
Milkman by Anna Burns
Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders
Bewilderment by Richard Powers
Great Circle
by Maggie Shipstead
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
The Great Beauty (film)
Meltdown Festival
Eliot Ness and the Mad Butcher by Max Allan Collins and A. Brad Schwartz 
Catch the Rabbit by Lana Bastasic, translated by the author

Related episodes: 

Episode 012 - Some Bookers and Some Madness
Episode 088 - Author Head Space with Sara Moore
Episode 090 - Reading Envy Readalong: East of Eden with Ellie and Jeff
Episode 112 - Reset Button with Eleanor Thoele
Episode 129 - Coming Back to Books with Nadine
Episode 130 - All the Jennifers with Fern Ronay
Episode 192 - Sly Milieu with Thomas

Stalk me online:


Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy
Strong Words is @strongwordsmag on Instagram
Strong Words on Twitter


All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.





Friday, August 20, 2021

Review: The Beautiful Ones

The Beautiful Ones The Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I finally read this (she writes so fast I had two books by her on my eARC backlog! I made myself read this one before Velvet Was the Night).

It's like... alt history or just nameless vague regency plus a little bit of telekinetic magic. No Mexican folklore or mythology elements that I can identify although some reviews have labeled it as "telenovela" - perhaps only because of who the author is? It has quite a few similarities to Shades of Milk and Honey but the pacing is quite slow - I found myself skimming to the parts between Nina and Hector.

Here's my confession - there's a lot of space between expectation and experience in this one. I'm so used to her usual mode of taking a strong female, uprooting her, and placing her into a story that is somehow colored by Mexican or Central American mythology or folklore that I kind of felt like this story wasn't as interesting without that component. There is a woman, Nina, who is uprooted, and has been a bit of an outcast because of her telekinetic abilities. She bonds with a performer who has similar abilities and hopes to marry him, but his story has a lot of secrets that get in the way.

My second confession - since I've read her vampire book, her gods book, etc., I thought The Beautiful Ones would be some kind of supernatural being. I'm kind of bummed that they aren't.

In the society itself are the "beautiful ones" who seem to be old money types who don't actually have money, but they are well-mannered and still hold a place in society. She has this blood but was raised outside the city and starts out with her cousin who is supposed to help her find a husband. But nobody wants her to use her abilities in public! And okay I love telekinetic stuff in books (The Girl with the Silver Eyes was my absolutely favorite book as a kid) but it's a little too infrequent in this book that I found myself skimming to those parts, since the rest of it is paced pretty slowly. Some exciting things that happen, like a duel, just held no interest to me whatsoever.

One thing I really liked, and I hope we see this again from the author, was her omniscient narrator voice - the point of view doesn't switch but we are able to see the thinking of more than one character, and I really like being able to do this. The way she wrote it, it added a lot to the story, leaving the reader with a more complete picture than the characters sometimes had. Still, the other issues like pacing and lack of development make it at the bottom of the author's oeuvre for me.

Thanks to the publisher for granting me access to this title via Edelweiss. It came out April 27!

View all my reviews

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Review: A Spare Life

A Spare Life A Spare Life by Lidija Dimkovska
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book has a history on my shelves. It comes from Two Lines Press but I actually received it a few years ago from the Malaprop's paperback-first subscription. The bookseller who selected those titles has proven to have excellent taste even if I didn't get to them right away.

And this will count for Women in Translation Month and Read the World 21 (Balkans) as well as the #exyulit challenge - not to mention I get to check North Macedonia off my Around the World list and for my Europe 2021 challenge. This book is good evidence that reading challenges get us to read books we might not get to otherwise!

This rather long novel is the story of twin sisters who were born conjoined at the head. It's also the story of Yugoslavia, Macedonia, and the split of the country through war, religious, and political change. The author tries to use the sisters to speak metaphorically about the region, and it wasn't too obtuse to grasp, even in translation. The very long chapters cover specific time periods for the sisters.

View all my reviews

Thursday, August 12, 2021

Books Read July 2021: 166-188

July was more chaotic than we expected so I didn't read as much as I expected!

A gentle reminder that all reviews can still be seen on my Goodreads profile (the review will be with the book; the format will be specified unless it's in print.) And the books with green outlines are my 5-star reads for the month!

 


166. The Seed Keeper by Diane Wilson  ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
167.  Bewilderness by Karen Tucker ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
168. We Are the Baby-Sitters Club edited by Marisa Crawford ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
169. That Summer by Jennifer Weiner ⭐️⭐️⭐️
170. American Dreamer by Adriana Herrera, narrated by Sean Crisden ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
171. Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch by Rivka Galchen, narrated by Natasha Soudek ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
172. Easy Crafts for the Insane by Kelly Williams Brown ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
173. The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict and Victoria Christopher Murray ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
174. Panorama by Dušan Šarotar, translated by Rawley Grau ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
175. Sweet Tooth, vol. 1 by Jeff Lemire  ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
176. The Divorce by César Aira, translated by Chris Andrews ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
177. Nobody Somebody Anybody by Kelly McClorey ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
178. A Psalm for the Wild Built by Becky Chambers ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
179. Come Together, Fall Apart by Cristina Henriquez, narrated by Kyla Garcia, Luis Moreno, Frankie Corzo, Roxanne Hernandez ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
180. The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson ⭐️⭐️
181. The Startup Wife by Tahmina Anam ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
182. The Past is Red by Catherynne M. Valente ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
183. The Heiress of Water by Sandra Rodriguez Barron ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
184. Toddler Adoption by Mary Hopkins-Best ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
185. Dear Senthuran by Akwaeke Emezi, read by Akwaeke Emezi ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
186. Hot Under His Collar by  Andie J. Christopher ⭐️⭐️⭐️
187. Oh Crap! I Have a Toddler by Jamie Glowacki ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
188. Finding Freedom Erin French  ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 

 
 

Total Books Read:23

Reread: 0

audio: 4
eBook: 13
print: 6

borrowed: 1 
library: 6
personal copy:  2
review copy: 13
subscription: 1

Around the World: 5
Erin & Dani's Book Club: 0
Europe 2021: 1
Read the World 21 (Central America): 2
Tournament of Books: 1
Upstate International Book Club: 0
Work book club: 0

Graphic Novel/Comic: 1
Memoir: 4
Music:
Nature: 0
Poetry: 0
Translated: 1
Women in Translation:

 

Tuesday, August 10, 2021

Reading Envy 226 - Cucumber Sandwiches with Lindy Pratch

Lindy joins me to talk books, where we discuss Canadian lit, vignettes and white space in writing, and what really makes a monster.

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 226: Cucumber Sandwiches

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
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Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed: 


 

You're Eating an Orange. You are Naked. by Sheung-King
Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch by Rivka Galchen
The Centaur's Wife by Amanda Leduc
The Seed Keeper by Diane Wilson
What Willow Says by Lynn Buckle

Other mentions:

Shadow Giller Prize
How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa
Giller Prize
Kuessipan by Naomi Fontaine
Tournament of Books
A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki
Jeanette Winterson
Atmospheric Disappearances by Rivka Galchen
The Archive of Alternate Endings by Lindsey Drager
Disfigured by Amanda Leduc
LitFest Alberta
The Fabulous Zed Watson! by Basil Sylvester and Kevin Sylvester
Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer
2019 Canadian Human Rights Tribunal report about Indigenous children
When the Light of the World was Subdued.... edited by Joy Harjo
The Summer Book by Tove Jansson
Beneath the Rising by Premee Mohamed
And Miles to Go Before I Sleep by Jocelyn Saucier
Come Together, Fall Apart by Cristina Henriquez

Related episodes: 

Episode 095 - Lose the Outside World with Lindy Pratch
Episode 124 - Mush Creatures with Lindy Pratch
Episode 159 - Reading Doorways with Lindy
Episode 196 - Miscommunication with Lindy
Episode 221 - Joint Poetry Readalong with Book Cougars
Episode 223 - Cicada Season with Rachel Mans McKenny

Stalk me online:

Lindy Reads and Reviews (blog)
Lindy on Twitter
Lindy is @Lindy on Litsy
Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy
Follow ShadowGiller on Twitter


All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.




Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Reading Envy 225: Books About Libraries and Librarians

I'm joined first by Marie Benedict and Victoria Christopher Murray to discuss their joint novel, and decided to ask my co-workers for their favorite books on libraries and librarians. The episode finishes up with a few reading recommendations based on questions I've answered from listeners.

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 225: Books About Libraries and Librarians

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed:



The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict and Victoria Christopher Murray

Other mentions:

My review of The Personal Librarian
An Illuminated Life
by Heidi Ardizzone
Yellow Wife by Sadeqa Johnson
Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi
The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
Lirael by Garth Nix
The Giver of Stars by JoJo Moyes
The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson
The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami
Glaciers by Alexis M. Smith
The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai
A Hidden Fire by Elizabeth Hunter
American Dreamer by Adriana Herrera
Bear by Marian Engel
Kitsy Babcock: Library Assistant by Joan Sargent
Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson
The Library by Sarah Stewart
Penelope Popper, Book Doctor by Toni Buzzeo
Library Lion by Michelle Knudsen
Wild About Books by Judy Sierra
Help! I’m a Prisoner in the Library by Eth Clifford


Related episodes:

Episode 138 - Shared Landscape with Lauren Weinhold

Stalk me online:

Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy

All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.



Sunday, July 25, 2021

Review: The Startup Wife

The Startup Wife The Startup Wife by Tahmima Anam
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

"No one wants to be married to the guy everyone thinks is going to save the world."

Asha is a skilled coder and drops out of a PhD program to start an app with her high school crush, at the same time they decide to marry on a whim. Cyrus only wants to be involved if they can "do things differently," and goes on to be the guru-CEO of their company that helps people create rituals and connect outside of a traditional religious background.

I like the combination of start-up culture with marriage dynamics, the guru persona and what it's like to be connected to it, and then the author even writes in the pandemic (which works perfectly with this start-up!)

You may recognize the author from historical fiction novel A Golden Age which is set in 1971 East Pakistan; I read that at the end of 2019. Both books include women who are in a high-stress situations but they have very different feels and sensibilities.

I had a copy of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss, which I sought out after seeing it on The Millions' list.

View all my reviews

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Review: The Personal Librarian

The Personal Librarian The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Belle la Costa Greene was J.P. Morgan's personal librarian (and rare books and art collector) who went on to run The Morgan Library after his death, converting it into the public serving institution he always planned. Her story is fascinating, having to pass as white to live/work/move in the circles she did, how this issue separated her parents, etc. The authors did a great job at blending research with imagination; Belle may have burned her personal papers but all the people she wrote to and did business with over the years did not!

An interview with the authors will come up on the podcast but in the meantime I can recommend this book of historical fiction!

View all my reviews

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Reading Envy 224: School's Out with Elizabeth

Elizabeth is back, and on a school break, when she can read more of the books she has been meaning to get to. We also solve a literary mystery before the end of this episode.

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 224: School's Out

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed:

Book covers that are discussed in this episode (list follows)
 

The Push by Ashley Audrain
The Sunlit Night by Rebecca Dinerstein (Knight)
Show Me a Sign by Ann Clare LeZotte
The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo
One Long River of Song by Brian Doyle


Other mentions:

The Overstory by Richard Powers
Bewilderment by Richard Powers
The Hidden Life of Trees
by Peter Wohlleben
The Heartbeat of Trees by Peter Wohlleben
Tides by Jonathan White
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds
Hex by Rebecca Dinerstein Knight
Helen Keller
El Deafo by Cece Bell
Nick by Michael Farris Smith
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Mink River by Brian Doyle
The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien
How to Carry Water by Lucille Clifton
Rememberings by Sinead O'Connor
The Cold Millions by Jess Walter


Related episodes:

Episode 033 - An Undulating Thrum with guests Ruth and Elizabeth
Episode 051 - Dreaming in Books with Karen
Episode 061 - Never Do That to a Book with Elizabeth
Episode 136 - Six Pack with Elizabeth
Episode 160 - Reading Plays with Elizabeth
Episode 201 - Wrestling with Complexity with Elizabeth and Laurie
Episode 202 - Jacket Flap with Chris and Emily

Stalk us online:

Elizabeth at Goodreads   
Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy

All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.


Monday, July 12, 2021

Review: Everyone Knows Your Mother Is a Witch

Everyone Knows Your Mother Is a Witch Everyone Knows Your Mother Is a Witch by Rivka Galchen
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is my last read for the Tournament of Books Camp ToB, and I think this is my favorite, although none were five-star reads for me.

Johannes Kepler is known for his astronomy discoveries but the context of that work is the era of the plague, and people not understanding disease, much less the universe. His mother Katharina is accused of being a witch in her old age and this is the (fictionalized) story of the trial, largely told through testimonies of her neighbors, who looking back now blame all ailments, failures, and deaths on her. There are also letters from Katharina to her son and others. It is historical fiction, recentering a female character, with some humor and conjecture. The ending was rather fun.

The audiobook is narrated by Natasha Soudek she does a lot of different voices for the characters.

And kudos to me for making it through a historical fiction novel, which is just usually not my thing. 🥴


View all my reviews

Sunday, July 4, 2021

Review: The Seed Keeper

The Seed Keeper The Seed Keeper by Diane Wilson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you loved Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants, this is a novel along similar themes. When Rosalie's husband dies, she returns to her father's home in Minnesota on Dakhota land, a place she has not been since she was removed and placed into foster care as a child. The timeline moves back and forth and sometimes the pov switches to another character as it tells the story of a people, the land, the seeds, and those who keep them.

CW for those already experiencing trauma surrounding residential schools, foster care, and the general removal of culture and home that so many endured.

View all my reviews

Thursday, July 1, 2021

Books Read June 2021: 142-165

I read slightly less in June, but also bailed on a few books I wasn't into. I should have bailed on more! The absolute highlight is The Actual Star by Monica Byrne - I can't wait for more people to read it when it comes out in September.

A gentle reminder that all reviews can still be seen on my Goodreads profile (the review will be with the book; the format will be specified unless it's in print.) And the books with green outlines are my 5-star reads for the month!

142. Milkman by Anna Burns, narrated by Brid Brennan ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
143. The Bookshop of Second Chances by Jackie Fraser ⭐️⭐️⭐️
144. Even As We Breathe by Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
145. Fifty Miles from Tomorrow by William L. Iggiagruk Hensley ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
146. The Mountain and the Sea by Kwame Dawes, narrated by Paula-Anne Jones ⭐️⭐️⭐️
147. We Are Satellites by Sarah Pinsker ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
148. Sansei and Sensibility by Karen Tei Yamashita ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
149. Getaway Girl by Tessa Bailey, narrated by Joe Hempel and Lori Prince ⭐️⭐️⭐️
150. The Sunlit Night by Rebecca Dinerstein (Knight) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
151. Whereabouts by Jhumpa Lahiri, translated by Jhumpa Lahiri; narrated by Susan Vinciotti Bonito ⭐️⭐️⭐️
152. The Sunrise by Victoria Hislop ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
153. Folk Stories from the Hills of Puerto Rico by Rafael Ocasio ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 
154. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, narrated by Jake Gyllenhaal ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
155. Songs in Ursa Major by Emma Brodie ⭐️⭐️⭐️
156. The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
157. The Road Trip by Beth O'Leary ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
158. The Courage to Teach by Parker J. Palmer ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
159. Detransition, Baby by Torrey Peters, narrated by Renata Friedman ⭐️⭐️⭐️
160. The Actual Star by Monica Byrne ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
161. nîtisânak by Lindsay Nixon ⭐️⭐️⭐️
162. Hang the Moon by Alexandria Bellefleur ⭐️⭐️⭐️
163. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro, narrated by Sura Siu ⭐️⭐️⭐️
164. Art for the Ladylike by Whitney Otto ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
165. Strange Planet by Nathan W. Pyle ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 

Total Books Read: 24

Reread:2

audio: 7
eBook: 10
print: 7

borrowed: 1
library: 5
personal copy: 9
review copy: 8
subscription:0

Around the World: 4
Erin & Dani's Book Club: 2
Europe 2021: 2
Read the World 21 (Scandinavia): 1
Tournament of Books: 5
Upstate International Book Club: 1
Work book club: 1

Graphic Novel/Comic: 1
Memoir: 3
Music: 1
Nature: 0
Poetry: 0
Translated: 1
Women in Translation:1

 

Tuesday, June 29, 2021

So you want to appear on the podcast... v.2

This is an update to the original version, posted in 2015. Times have changed! 

I am perpetually hungry for podcast guests! Here are some frequently asked questions.

Who are you looking for to be on the podcast?
Most guests are people who read - all ages, all genres.  The books you read do not have to be new releases.

How can I get on the schedule?
Contact me, readingenvy [at] gmail. We will discuss the particulars. Since I post an episode every two weeks, I try to record every two weeks. I have Thursday nights blocked out for recording but am completely flexible - otherwise I would not be able to have podcast guests from overseas!

Can I bring a friend?
Yes! I think the magical number is three people at once, including me. If you have another reading friend who wants to be on the podcast at the same time, that would be great. I have at times paired strangers together.

How are the episodes recorded?
Right now I record in Zoom.  If I record in person, I record directly in Audacity.

What are the technical requirements?
It works best if each person has at least a headset mic and is plugged into an internet connection (not just wireless). That said we have successfully recorded podcasts using internal mics, cellphones, etc.  If we are new to each other, we might decide to test the connection ahead of time.

If you live within an hour radius I will probably try to record in person, because the sound quality is better without the internet involved.

How can I prepare for the episode?
This depends on how many people are on the episode. If it is just two of us, each of us will bring three books to talk about. These should be books you liked and read recently enough that you can discuss them. Please don't feel like you have to pick the THREE GREATEST BOOKS OF ALL TIME because that really isn't the point. If there are three of us, each person only needs to bring two books. Be able to summarize the book and find an excerpt to read if possible (some books are not as conducive to excerpting, and if you have an advanced reader copy of a book, we can't include excerpts.)

I also ask guests who are new to the podcast about what they like to read in general, and let guests plug any online presence or project they want to, as long as that isn't their sole reason to appear.

I've never done anything like this before and I'm hesitant/nervous
Don't worry! I remember my nerves the first time I was on the SFF Audio podcast. Sometimes things go wrong - Siri will start talking, a dog will bark, a phone will ring. I can edit that kind of thing out. I also edit out awkward pauses and people that go on too long. Ha. I'm not just posting raw audio to the internet. I don't record on separate tracks so if one person's noise covers up another person's comments, that can be more difficult. We will try hard to overcome all obstacles, but I'm a big fan of the "good enough" philosophy. You love to read? We'll make it work.

Some people have used the strategy of a nickname, and that is always fine. Nobody has to know it is you.

Another suggestion I make is to listen to a few episodes. It will give you a sense of format, scope, and depth.

I'm an author/publisher/editor and want to pimp my latest project. Are you interested?
I have had authors from time to time, but usually I am asking them because I think they have an interesting perspective or I already know I enjoy their work and want them to talk more about it. I also try to stick to the concept of authors-who-read.  So probably not, but you can ask.

Since we're on the topic, will you review my book?
You can ask, but I only take review copies for books that interest me. I already have several avenues to acquire review copies and still want time to read non-review books. I also do not talk about every book I read on the podcast, because I read over 200 books a year.
 

Reading Envy 223: Cicada Season with Rachel Mans McKenny

Jenny and Rachel discuss books that didn't get as much attention as they deserved during the early days of the pandemic, science in fiction, a new podcast, and more.

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 223: Cicada Season

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed: 

 
Book covers discussed in the episode, plus Rachel's headshot and book cover.

Beneath the Rising
by Premee Mohamed
While Justice Sleeps by Stacey Abrams, narrated by Adenrele Ojo
Lakewood by Megan Giddings
Broken Horses by Brandi Carlile
Nightbitch by Rachel Yoder

Other mentions:

The Butterfly Effect by Rachel Mans McKenny
Blind Date with a Book Podcast (first episode posts June 30, 2021)
@bookmeetcute on Instagram and Twitter
Real Life by Brandon Taylor
Hex by Rebecca Dinerstein Knight
Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi
The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood
The Lady's Guide to Celestial Mechanics by Olivia Waite
Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malinda Lo
A Broken Darkness by Premee Mohamed
Selena Montgomery
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
The Pisces by Melissa Broder
Bunny by Mona Awad
Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner
The Hidden Palace by Helene Wecker
The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

Related episodes:

Episode 008 - Gone Rogue with guests Steve Richardson, Libby Young, and Mike Winiski
Episode 150 - Rife with Storytelling with Sara
Episode 164 - Character Driven with Carol Ann
Episode 186 - This is Gravity with Jeff
Episode 190 - The Good Life with Alex

Stalk us online:

Rachel's website
Rachel is @rmmckenny on Twitter; @rachelmansmckenny on Instagram; @rachelm on Litsy
Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy

All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.





Sunday, June 20, 2021

Review: The Chosen and the Beautiful

The Chosen and the Beautiful The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When I reread The Great Gatsby, I hadn't really remembered the character of Jordan Baker, a friend of Daisy and sometimes narrator. In this retelling, she is the focus, lending a queer, Asian, and sometimes magical perspective. I know I claim to dislike retellings, but I loved this!

Since the original work is now famously in the public domain, many authors have been taking the work and running with it. Nghi Vo uses some pieces verbatim, whether they be dialogue or scene setters, but always for a purpose of showing from a different angle. Jordan has a lot of access to the characters, after all, and also has the ability to create out of paper cutting (took me back to The Paper Menagerie by Ken Liu.) Gatsby may have more secrets than we knew, the rich and famous drink Demoniac, and there seems to be glamour beyond just what money can buy.

I've been putting in some shifts as a summer advisor at work, and one day I brought this with me to read over a break. One of the incoming students was telling me about writing about Gatsby for her AP exam, and I pulled this book out to show her. Maybe I have a little glamour myself.

View all my reviews

Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Reading Envy 222: Minty Fresh with Courtney

Courtney drops by to discuss reading goals updates, to school Jenny on using Reddit for reading, and we may go on a few mutiny and gardening tangents. There is a content warning at the top of this episode so please listen closely!

Download or listen via this link:
Reading Envy 222: Minty Fresh

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed: 

Book covers of the five books listed below.

A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore
Sparrow Envy by J. Drew Lanham
Unbowed by Wangari Maathai
My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell; narrated by Grace Gummer
The Voyage of the Narwhal by Andrea Barrett

Other mentions:

Reddit r/fantasy
Reddit - Suggest me a Book
Reddit - What's that book called?
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Fool by Christopher Moore
The Serpent of Venice by Christopher Moore
Island of the Sequined Love Nun
by Christopher Moore
The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove by Christopher Moore
The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore
On Being Podcast - J. Drew Lanham
-ologies podcast
The Home Place by J. Drew Lanham
We Are Each Other's Harvest by Natalie Baszile
Queen Sugar by Natalie Baszile
A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara
The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara
The Terror by Dan Simmons
Serpent in Paradise by Dea Birkett
The Liar's Dictionary by Eley Williams
Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore
The Galaxy and The Ground Within by Becky Chambers
While Justice Sleeps by Stacey Abrams
The Food Explorer by Daniel Stone

Related episodes:

Episode 064 - Reading Down the Rabbit Hole with guest Tracy Landrith
Episode 104
- Uppity Lives and Jelly Melons with Jason Roland 
Episode 179 - Think of the Bees with Courtney Burson
Episode 210 - Reading Goals 2021

Stalk us online:

Courtney at Goodreads
Courtney is @conservio on Litsy
Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy

All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.



Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Reading Envy 221: Joint Poetry Readalong

Chris and Emily of the Book Cougars join me for discussion part 1 of our joint readalong - When the Light of the World was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry edited by Joy Harjo et al. I also recorded the group discussion some of the Reading Envy Readers had, so I've included the majority of that discussion as well. It makes the episode slightly longer than usual, but I figure if you were in on discussing this amazing anthology, you'd likely be in for both discussions. Some people really took on the challenge to try poetry, and I know some readers are still working on it. Stay tuned to the Book Cougars where part 2 of our joint readalong, Braiding Sweetgrass, will post June 8th.

Download or listen via this link: Reading Envy 221: Joint Poetry Readalong

Subscribe to the podcast via this link: Feedburner
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: Subscribe
Or listen through TuneIn
Or listen on Google Play
Or listen via Stitcher
Or listen through Spotify 
Or listen through Google Podcasts


Books discussed:

Chris, Jenny, and Emily from their houses in Zoom, holding up the books discussed.

When the Light of the World was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry edited by Joy Harjo et al.
A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver

Other mentions:

Studies in American Indian Literature by Paula Gunn Allen
The Sacred Hoop by Paula Gunn Allen
Spider Woman's Granddaughters by Paula Gunn Allen
Birchbark Books
Sharks in the Time of Saviors by Kawai Strong Washburn
Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer
Weigh in on the fall readalong

Related episodes:

Episode 090 - Reading Envy Readalong: East of Eden
Episode 099 - Readalong: The Secret History
Episode 118
- Reading Envy Readalong: To the Bright Edge of the World
Episode 137 - Reading Envy Readalong: The Golden Notebook
Episode 157
- Joint Readalong of Gone with the Wind with Book Cougars
Episode 185 - The Loyal Swineherd (Odyssey readalong)
Episode 193 - And I Feel Fine (Ducks, Newburyport READALONG)
Book Cougars - Joint Readalong of Sapphira and the Slave Girl
Books on the Go - Ep. 121 - American Sunrise with Jenny Colvin 


Stalk us online:

Book Cougars website/podcast
Book Cougars are @bookcougars in Instagram
Jenny at Goodreads
Jenny on Twitter
Jenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy

All links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.




Monday, May 31, 2021

Books Read May 2021: 114-141

This month I focused on the two books for the joint readalong with the Book Cougars, and also found a new audiobook listening pattern that increased my consumption of that format (and lessened that of other formats.) Hardly any speculative fiction, a lot more non-fiction, even a few thrillers! And a heck of a lot of 5-star reads.

A gentle reminder that all reviews can still be seen on my Goodreads profile (the review will be with the book; the format will be specified unless it's in print.) And the books with green outlines are my 5-star reads for the month!


114. Onion Skin by Edgar Camacho ⭐️⭐️⭐️
115. Unsettled Ground by Claire Fuller ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
116. Meaty by Samantha Irby, read by Samantha Irby ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
117. Four Hundred Souls edited by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blaine ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
118. The Nine Lives of Rose Napolitano by Donna Freitas, narrated by Kristen Sieh ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
119. Love in Case of Emergency by Daniela Krien ⭐️⭐️⭐️
120. When the Light of the World was Subdued... edited by Joy Harjo et al ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
121. True Story by Kate Reed Petty ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
122. The Doll by Ismail Kadare, translated by John Hodgson ⭐️⭐️⭐️
123. Northern Spy by Flynn Berry ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
124. My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell, narrated by Grace Gummer ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
125. Arsenic and Adobo by Mia P. Manansala ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
126. The Guncle by Steven Rowley ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
127. The Dangers of Smoking in Bed by Mariana Enriquez, translated by Megan McDowell ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
128. Margreete's Harbor by Eleanor Morse ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
129. A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki, read by Ruth Ozeki ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
130. Tomb Song by Julián Herbert, translated by Christina MacSweeney ⭐️⭐️⭐️
131. Broken Horses by Brandi Carlile, read by Brandi Carlile ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
132. The Pursuit of Love by Nancy Mitford ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
133. Sparrow Envy by J. Drew Lanham ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
134. While Justice Sleeps by Stacey Abrams, narrated by Adenrele Ojo ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
135. Second Place by Rachel Cusk ⭐️⭐️⭐️
136. The Butterfly Effect by Rachel Mans McKenny, narrated by Carly Robins ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
137. The Invisible Husband of Frick Island by  Colleen Oakley ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
138. Untamed Shore by  Silvia Moreno-Garcia, read by Maria Liatis ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
139. Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
140. Faces in the Crowd by Valeria Luiselli, translated by Christina MacSweeney ⭐️⭐️⭐️
141. Sanditon by Jane Austen (incomplete) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 

 

Total Books Read: 28

Reread: 1

audio: 9
eBook: 10
print: 9

library: 9
personal copy: 5
review copy: 13
subscription: 1

Around the World: 8
Europe 2021: 3
Read the World 21 (Mexico): 4

Crime/Mystery/Thriller: 5
Graphic Novel/Comic: 1
Memoir: 2
Music: 2
Nature: 2
Poetry: 2
Translated: 6
Women in Translation: 3

 

Thursday, May 27, 2021

Review: Second Place

Second Place

Second Place by Rachel Cusk
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

**This entire review might be a spoiler** 

I read some of this, I put it aside. I'm used to this initial response to Cusk, and usually feel gratified I've gone back to it. I'm not sure I'm feeling that yet about this one, but my feelings could change.

I went to Instagram first and pleaded for people who had already read it to discuss it with me. Before I even finished, I listened to the interview with the reviewer for the New York Times Book Review on the NYTBR Podcast talk about her approach and she let slide that this is all based on Cusk reading this memoir and then imagining that author's experience and then reimagining it into a different landscape and slightly different details and writing it from that perspective... but the reviewer also said that she saw all other reviews mentioning that detail up front, and feeling that the author kept it until the end for a reason. I listened to the author's interview with Michael Silverblatt on the KCRW Bookworm Podcast, where he started with the "spoiler." That's why this whole review is listed as a spoiler - it's hard to talk about with the book without knowing that the author read this obscure memoir about the time D.H. Lawrence came to stay with this artist in Taos. Once you know that, you can really see the author's wheels turning, and this book is the grain or the chaff. Maybe both.

If it's a spoiler, though, it's also the thing that helped me think it through and understand it, even if I still don't really know if I think it worked. It's interesting that she relocated it too. Cusk is someone who was born in Canada, grew up different places, lives in the UK... I think I thought she was American but she might as well be anything. The book is set in a marsh but we don't know which country, so few details are really there. Some read apocalypse narrative into the background but I wasn't sure that was there or if the people have just separated themselves from a sense of daily life. And she writes! with a lot of exclamation points! to someone named Jeffers! who is never explained.

Part of me felt it was the Barefoot Contessa who always is making everything "for Jeffrey" which might come across a bit loony if you didn't know better.

And all along she is dealing with a poor self image, or maybe just aging as a woman when your former power, if you ever had it, starts to wear thing, especially in comparison to the woman the artist brought with him when he came to visit. And her daughter is young 20s, a difficult age for mothers, I think.

I will keep mulling it over. Five-star mulling success, three-star success as a book... for now.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me access through Edelweiss. This came out May 4th, 2021.


View all my reviews

Review: While Justice Sleeps

While Justice Sleeps While Justice Sleeps by Stacey Abrams
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Every time I teach my Reading class, I ask my students to read a book from a genre they don't usually read, and then I try to do the same, although I've done this enough I'm now turning to subgenres. I've read thrillers, but never a legal thriller!

Avery Keene is the law clerk for one of the Supreme Court justices, and when he falls into a coma, she finds herself named his legal guardian. She is thrown into international intrigue and a string of hidden documents that only she can solve.

The audiobook includes an intro by Abrams, where she talks about the publishing journey that began in 1995, where publishers felt some of the characters were too unrealistic - a president out for his own financial gain, justices of questionable character, etc.

If you don't know who Stacey Abrams is, you should. She's a major political player, and I like this somewhat more distant profile of her at the BBC. She also writes romance novels under a pen name, Selena Montgomery.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me eBook access through NetGalley, even if I ultimately went for this in audio. It's out and ready for a listen/read.

View all my reviews

Friday, May 21, 2021

Review: Broken Horses

Broken Horses Broken Horses by Brandi Carlile
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is a must-listen memoir with songs between chapters and at the end. Brandi Carlile is one of my favorite singers but there is so much I didn't know, and she has experienced some incredible moments of fate or destiny or something that really make for an incredible story. I also liked the discovery of the stories behind so many of these songs and albums. The story goes all the way up through covid times.

Her connections to other musicians are life-long love stories, and people like Tanya Tucker, Elton John, and Joni Mitchell come back into her life as real people. Amazing.

Do you have a favorite song by her? I think mine is still Shadows on the Wall.

Copied from the publisher website:

Carlile recorded new stripped-down, solo renditions of more than 30 of the songs featured in the book, including her own and songs from artists who’ve inspired her, from Dolly Parton to Elton John, Leonard Cohen and more, available exclusively on the audiobook:

“I Don’t Hurt Anymore” by Hank Snow
“Coat of Many Colors” by Dolly Parton
“Ride on Out” by Brandi Carlile
“Honky Cat” by Elton John and Bernie Taupin
“Philadelphia” by Neil Young
“Happy” by Brandi Carlile
“That Year” by Brandi Carlile
“Hallelujah” by Leonard Cohen
“Eye of the Needle” by Brandi Carlile
“Turpentine” by Brandi Carlile
“Wasted” by Brandi Carlile
“The Story” by Brandi Carlile
“Closer to You” by Brandi Carlile
“Caroline” by Brandi Carlile
“Josephine” by Brandi Carlile
“Sugartooth” by Brandi Carlile
“Looking Out” by Brandi Carlile
“Beginning to Feel the Years” by Brandi Carlile
“Love Songs” by Brandi Carlile
“I Will” by Brandi Carlile
“I Belong to You” by Brandi Carlile

I had a review copy of the audio from Random House Audio that I listened to through the Volumes app. The book came out April 20, 2021.

View all my reviews